Disappointment runneth over.

So, nearly six weeks ago the Caldecott and Newbery awards were announced and I was completely wrong on all predictions. And quite disappointed by the awarded books, to be honest. I felt like the committee for the 2016 year’s selection was pretty off-the-mark.

I felt like certain books were far and away better than the awardees, actually. Here are some of my favorites from 2016:

Ida, Always by Caron Levis. See previous post from oh so long ago. I finished out the year of 2016 still considering this book as one of the best of the year.

Nobody Likes a Goblin by Ben Hatke. I read this book several times to school groups and it was a hit each time. It’s a great story and well illustrated.

The Wild Robot by Peter Brown. WHY DIDN’T THIS GET ANY SORT OF RECOGNITION BY THE NEWBERY SELECTION COMMITTEE? This was fantastic. Well-written, great illustrations, simply amazing story line, and just a really beautiful children’s chapter book. If this isn’t turned into a movie, I would be shocked.

The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas. I thought the illustrations in this book were far and away the most beautiful of all the 2016 releases. The story was gentle and sort of sad, but also sweet. It didn’t really get a great reception from the kids, but I think it’s one of those books adults buy for themselves (or, is it just me?).

 

My first book recommendation for 2016

On a scale of emotional reading rated 1-10, I’m in the neighborhood of a 10 when it comes to getting ‘feels’ about books. I want a book to make me feel something. I don’t even mind if it’s anger or confusion, but I need to feel some sort of emotion when I’m reading. This goes for books I read for pleasure and books I read to my storytimers (at times, these categories overlap, of course). If I feel happy when I’m reading a picture book, it will come through to my littlest ones in my programs. If I’m feeling sad, it comes through as well. I try to avoid the sad books in storytime. But, sometimes those sad books are so beautiful that I do a mini book talk to the parents and grandparents of my storytimers while the kids are choosing their books for the week. I have several parents who ask me for recommendations for books for their children and some who I just sort of butt in and say, “Have you guys read this yet? I think you’ll like it!” and they tend to placate me by taking it and checking it out.

I’ve mentioned before that I process all the new books that come into my library, so I have a chance to read the new picture books before I put them out on the shelf. I also read the publisher magazines to get a feel for what’s coming my way. That way, I can also get my name on the hold list to ensure I get a copy of a certain book if I know I definitely want it at my branch. This scenario happened last week with a book I’ve been awaiting arrival for a few weeks. It’s my favorite book of the year so far and I think it’s definitely setting the bar super high for children’s books this year. I know this is only March, but this book is outstanding.

But: It will make you cry. This is where my hesitance to read it at storytime comes in. I don’t want to cry in front of my little preschoolers and I don’t want them or their parents crying, either. It could really bring down the storytime. I’m not sure how we’d go from bawling about this book to singing a nursery rhyme or doing a craft. So, this book (while SPECTACULAR) is not on my list for storytime. However, I’ve been recommending it to some of my favorite families and the feedback has been good, except that they’ve all cried and haven’t necessarily made it through the entire book with the kids because the kids start crying because their parent/grandparent is crying and they don’t fully understand why.

Still, all this goes to give you fair warning if you read this book you will have feels. All the feels. But, it will stick with you and be beautiful. So, without further ado, I recommend to you the new picture book “Ida, Always” by Caron Levis, illustrated by Charles Santoso:

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This is inspired by a true story of a bear friendship and is the story of Gus and Ida, who live in a zoo in a big city. They are the best of friends, but one day Ida gets sick and Gus has to learn to deal with the changes that illness bring to his small world. (It makes me tear up to even remember the storyline.)  Gus and Ida are so wonderful and lovable. Levis describes the pain of illness and loss with gentleness, but without glossing over the confusion, helplessness, and anger that you feel when you’re losing someone you love and you can’t do anything about it. This such a beautifully written and illustrated book and I wish everyone would read it.

It’s too early to make ponderings about Caldecott and Newbery for next year, but this is hard to beat, I feel. So good. Just keep the tissues nearby.